Games & Gears Legends Series

Games & Gears Legends Series is a set of Kolinsky Sable Brushes, and I’ve been using them for about 4 months now, so I though it was time to share my views.

The set of 4 brushes, sizes 0, 2/0, 3/0, and 4/0, are aimed at detail work, and come in a nice protective case. They have Kolinsky Sable hairs, with the rest of the brush being of metal construction.

One of the neat and unique things about these brushes, is the way the handle comes apart and becomes a protective cap for the hairs, but just like the brushes, I found them a game of two halves!

The case is a nice bit of leather (faux?), and keeps the brushes together and out of harms way. With the brushes stored the correct way up the hair size is visible as soon as you open it, so you always get the correct one.

Games and Gears Legends series

The 0 and 2/0 hairs, I thought, looked a little larger than their designation, but they come to a nice and decisive point, which I found gave excellent accuracy, especially as they have a good rigidity and don’t flex too easily.

These two brushes hold a reasonable amount of paint and transfer it to the medium in a well-controlled, even manner, but the brushes themselves can occasionally be difficult to control, probably due to their weight – more on this shortly – and their fairly ‘chunky’ feel. The point stays true with paint applied, and they have always returned back into shape when cleaned – they do seem to clean up very easily.

Games and Gears Legends series
From left to right; 0, 2/0, 3/0, and 4/0.

Both the 3/0 and 4/0 brushes, though, were a little disappointing. There is quite a size difference going from the larger to the smaller brushes in terms of the ‘belly’ of the hairs, and I wonder how they grade them. I found the hairs to be too long and flex far too easily to give good accuracy, especially as they just won’t hold their point once loaded with paint, however little you apply. I wanted to use these smaller brushes for things like eyes, and buttons – the smallest of things that just require a small ‘dab’ here and there’ – but they splay, and I found I could only use the sides of the brush, rather than the tips, to apply paint.

Games and Gears Legends series
I found both the 3/0, and the 4/0, to long and flexible to give good accuracy.
They also splayed with paint applied.

A problem I found inherent to all the brushes, though, was their weight and balance. Being an all-metal construction means that the brushes are fairly weighty; the 2/0 comes in at 10g as opposed to the 3g of Citadel’s small Artificer Layer brush, which is comparable in hair size. This weight takes its toll after you’ve been painting for some time, but it’s the balance point that I found more disconcerting.

Games and Gears Legends series
The 2/0 G&G on the left, compared to Citadel’s small Artificer layer on the right.
The hairs are very similar, but notice how quickly the ferrule tapers out.

It is a personal thing, but I found the balance point too far up the handle – I tend to hold my brushes quite close to the hairs, as I find I get more accuracy this way – and when using them I was always fighting the brush to get it just where I wanted it. I can always tell the following morning which brushes I’ve been using, as my hand aches.

This is a pity because the ferrules are a really nice shape and length, and fit the hand well, especially the 4/0, which has a differently contoured ferrule to the others.

There is a way to mitigate this somewhat, and that’s to use them without the handle fitted. This shortening of the brush reduces the weight to 6g, and brings the balance point forward slightly, though for me it was still an issue, just not as bad as it was.

Removing the handle does lead to a big plus, at least for me, as I paint using a magnifying lamp, and having a brush that I can reduce to 90mm in length meant that I didn’t keep hitting the lamp with the handle, whilst trying to keep everything in focus!

In fact, I’ve stopped using them with the handle fitted, they’re just too uncomfortable and ill balanced, but the handle does make a fine protective cap when they’re not in use, much better than the little clear plastic ones you usually get with brushes.

But… they don’t fit that great! On two of them they’re really tight to get on and off, though to be honest, this is easing with use, but trying to get them off sometimes involves quite a bit of force – I’ve stopped pushing them on fully. On the other two brushes they’re actually quite loose, and have fell off on occasion.

Games and Gears Legends series
With using excessive force, this is as far as this one will push on!

Conclusion

The Legends set is priced at £35 on the Game & Gears Website, so they’re not the most expensive Sable brushes on the market, far from it. At £8.75 a brush (not taking into account the cost of the case), some would consider them a bargain compared to Citadel’s Artificer range, which averages out at £14.55 each when brought as a set of three, or the Winsor & Newton series 7 brushes at around £12-£13 each. But let’s just say that, you get what you pay for!

For me, these are a bit too form over function – they look fantastic with their all-metal construction and gimmicky handle, but when it comes down to performance, as an overall package, I found them sadly lacking, especially the two smaller haired brushes.

The performance of the hairs on the 0 and 2/0 brushes are pretty good, but let down by their weight and balance. Whereas the 3/0 and 4/0 were no starters for me in terms of detail painting – the hairs refused to hold a point and were far too long and flexible.

For £35, I’d be happier buying just two Citadel or Winsor brushes and pocketing the difference!

In Pictures…

6 thoughts on “Games & Gears Legends Series

  1. Impressive ! Nether ” taste” so professionnal brush. Some friends told me a clear difference but the price and mostly the life length always repel me

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Le Bim.
      I think it is a case of stick to what you know and can rely on.
      At the moment I favour Citadel, Winsor, and Rosemary brushes, and I think most other people do too!

      Liked by 3 people

  2. An interesting read, so thanks for sharing! The first thought that came to mind for me was weight and balance and I’ve long since given up on anything smaller than 00. Having become a bit more slapdash with age, I now find I’m happy enough with GW’s “layer” brushes! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks John. I too have done away with using the smaller sized brushes. As I’ve become a more confident painter I’ve found I can do the smallest details with a brush far larger than I ever imagined, and my Citadel layer ones keep going, and going, and… well, you get the idea!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Aside from the uneven (at best) quality and service I’ve gotten from G&G over the few times I’ve gotten things from them, I always do wonder about the seemingly-endless stream of “boutique” brushes that pop up on Kickstarter.
    My mental train of thought is akin to something like “Okay, so you’re saying that I can pay now to have some sable brushes that you promise will be the BEST EVAR delivered in 6-12-18 months.. OR I can pay half or less of the same price now for W&N S7 and have them delivered in 1-2 weeks?”
    So with that, I usually wonder why these things even exist, as opposed to walled-garden GW brushes as the only ones sold in their stores, or cheap brushes (which I also use a lot of). Gimmicks like the lids here, or the nice looking case are what these KS-based producers need to rely on for their USP when W&N/Rosemary & Co are already out there…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely spot on Azazel. These were something of an impulse buy at the UKGE, I don’t think I would ever actually buy brushes from a crowdfunding campaign. As you say, why take the chance and why wait, when excellent brushes, with a proven track record, are already easily available.

      Liked by 1 person

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